6 Facts You Should Know About Citrines

  • Citrine is the yellow-to-orange variety of Quartz.

  • Natural Citrine is not common; most Citrine on the gem market is produced by heat treating Amethyst and Smoky Quartz.

  • Citrine is the birthstone for the month of November.
  • Citrines rate 7.0 on the mohs hardness scale, and require special care when worn in jewellery.

  • The name Citrine is derived from the citron fruit, a yellow fruit similar to the lemon. (In fact, citron means "lemon" in several languages.)

  • Citrine is cut into all different shapes, especially oval and rectangular cuts.

August 05, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

Gemstones by Colour : Pink Gems

The most popular pink gemstones are tourmaline and spinel. Pink diamonds are lovely but rare. Morganite is a close cousin to the emerald, with a lovely peach-pink or purple-pink hue. Rhodolite garnet tends to be purple-pink. Pink Sapphires provide some of the richest pinks, and are available in a striking array of shades from pink to purple.

Some pink gemstones include: Pink Sapphire, Pink Ruby, Pink Tourmaline, Pink Spinel, Rhodolite Garnet, Rose Quartz, Kunzite, Morganite

August 03, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Tsavorites

  • The dazzling green Tsavorite is a highly prized gem variety of grossular garnet.

  • As Tsavorite and Tanzanite are very similar in chemical formula, they frequently occur together. 

  • Tsavorite is a young gemstone with a very long geological history. It was first discovered by Campbell Bridges in 1967 near Kenya’s Tsavo National Park. This region on the Kenya-Tanzania border remains the only source of the gem.

  • The world's few tsavorite mines lie in a uniquely beautiful landscape of arid grassland with bare, dry hills.

  • This rare African gem creates competition for emeralds because it is less included, rarely treated, and more durable.

  • Tsavorites rate 6.5 to 7.5 on the mohs hardness scale, and require extra care when worn in jewellery. 

 

July 31, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Spinel

  • Spinel is a brilliant red gem that is loved for its rich red colour and history.

  • Spinel is found in some of the same locales as ruby. This has led to centuries of great confusion in gemstone history, as spinels have often been mistaken for rubies.

  • Some of the famous "rubies" in the British crown jewels are actually spinels, including the 170-carat Black Prince's Ruby set into the British Imperial State Crown, and the Timur Ruby which is a 352 carat spinel engraved with the names of mogul emperors who previously owned it.

  • This spinel crystal’s shape is an octahedron. It has eight sides.

  • Red spinel is the most popular, but spinel is also available in many other colours including blue, hot pink, and bright orange. There are also star spinels and colour change spinels, which are considered to be quite rare.

  • Spinel is one of the hardest minerals. It rates 8.0 on the mohs hardness scale, making spinel well suited to be worn in jewellery.

 

 

July 29, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

Gemstones by Colour : White Gems

White is an elegant colour that matches any other, and one must only think of Audrey Hepburn's pearls in the opening scene of "Breakfast at Tiffany's" to appreciate the absolute elegance of white jewellery. Whether worn as a pendant, bracelet, ring, or beads, white gems will give your overall look desirable highlights and sparkle. 

Some white gemstones include: White Diamond, White Opal, Akoya Pearl, South Sea Pearl, Freshwater Pearl, White Spinel, White Moonstone, Beryllonite, White Jade, White Cassiterite, White Prehnite, White Andalusite, White Chalcedony, White Oglioclase, White Danburite, Howlite, White Aventurine, Milk Quartz, and White Star Sapphire

 

 

 

July 27, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Tanzanites

  • In 1962, a beautiful blue gemstone was discovered in the African country of Tanzania. It is not known for certain who found the first crystal. The most popular theory attributes the discovery to Ali Juuyawatu, a local tribesman. In 1967, Ali found a piece of translucent crystal near Mount Kilimanjaro. He shared his find with Manuel D'Souza, a tailor with a hobby of prospecting, who believed they had found an extraordinary and vibrant sapphire.

  • Maasai legend is that cattle herders first noticed this stone some 30 years before, after a brush-fire caused by lightning burned large areas of the plains at the base of Mt. Kilimanjaro in Tanzania. Brown gemstone crystals lying on the dry earth were caught in the fire. The Masai herders driving cattle in the area noticed the beautiful blue color and picked the crystals up, becoming the first tanzanite collectors.

  • Tanzanite's natural colour is brown, so it is routinely heat-treated to modify its colour. The treatment is stable with no additional durability concerns.
  • Tanzanite is the birthstone for the month of December.

  • Tanzanite can be a clear blue, violet-blue, or bluish purple. The richer the colour of the tanzanite, the more valuable it is. Pure blue or rich violet blue stones are the most valuable tanzanites. 

  • Tanzanite rates 6.5 to 7.0 on the mohs hardness scale, and requires special care when worn in jewellery.

July 17, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Rubies

  • Rubies are celebrated in the Bible and in ancient Sanskrit writings as the most precious of all gemstones. For centuries they have been the prized possession of emperors and kings.

  • Due to their striking red colour, rubies often represent strong emotions like love. According to legend, a ruby will bring good fortune on its owner.

  • Ruby is the birthstone for the month of July.

  • Ruby is the red variety of the corundum mineral species, while all other colors of corundum are called sapphire.


  • The best rubies are found in marble, ametamorphic rock. These have rich red color and usually glow bright red under sunlight. Darker rubies are found in igneous rock. 

  • Rubies rate 9.0 on the mohs hardness scale, making them well suited to be worn in jewellery.

July 15, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

Gemstones by Colour : Black Gems

Black stones are not limited to emo or goth fashion, nor to mourning jewelry - black gems are a beautiful complement white and pastel-colored clothing, or any colour at all. Black jewels, like white stones, are of neutral colour and lend understated elegance to your look without offending the shade of your clothes. 

Some black gemstones include: Black Opal, Black Diamond, Black Sapphire, Black Star Sapphire (pictured below), Black Garnet, Onyx, and Black Spinel

July 13, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Opals

  • Opals flash beautiful colours as you turn the stone or move around it. This phenomenon is called play-of-colour. An opal might show a single colour, two or three colours, or an entire rainbow.

  • Opal is the birthstone for the month of October.

  • The best play-of-colour is the brightest; an opal displaying a full rainbow is the most rare and valuable.

  • Opals are known by their background colours and are called "black," "white," "gray," or "fire" opals.

  • Once the rough opal is cut and polished, the play-of-colour will be brightest.

  • Opals rate 5.5 to 6.5 on the mohs hardness scale, and require special care when worn in jewellery. 

July 10, 2014 by Perrine Comeille

6 Facts You Should Know About Kunzites

  • Kunzite is a light pink to violet purple gem. It is usually free from inclusions that can be seen with the unaided eye.

  • Kunzite was discovered in 1902, and was named after George Frederick KunzTiffany & Co's chief jeweller, and a noted mineralogist.

  • Kunzite shows different colours from different angles. 

  • Kunzite crystals are usually long and have an uneven top. The way the kunzite crystal is formed makes it easy to break, so cutting it can be difficult.

  • Kunzite's colour comes from small amounts of manganese, a chemical element.

  • Kunzite rates 7.0  on the mohs hardness scale, and requires special care when worn in jewellery.

July 08, 2014 by Perrine Comeille